8:58 p.m.
Saturday, 18 November 2017

U.S. average weekly wage decreased over the year by 1.7% in 2011

Ir a las noticias

El Centro, California, july 14th.- From December 2010 to December 2011, employment increased in 266 of the 322 largest U.S. counties, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported.

Kern, Calif., posted the largest increase, with a gain of 5.3 percent over the year, compared with national job growth of 1.4 percent. Within Kern, the largest employment increase occurred in natural resources and mining, which gained 8,896 jobs over the year (16.7 percent). Benton, Wash., experienced the largest over-the-year decrease in employment among the largest counties in the U.S. with a loss of 3.4 percent.

The U.S. average weekly wage decreased over the year by 1.7 percent to $955 in the fourth quarter of 2011. This is one of only five declines in the history of the series which dates back to 1978.

This is the only quarter in which the average weekly wage decline occurred while employment grew over the year and total wages decreased (-0.5 percent). Smaller bonus payments in the fourth quarter of 2011 contributed to the decrease in the average weekly wage.

In contrast, the average weekly wage declines posted in the first two quarters of 2009 resulted from significant declines in both employment and wages. During this period, total wage declines were 5.0 percent or more, while employment losses were above 3.0 percent.

In the fourth quarter of 2011, Olmsted, Minn., had the largest over-the-year decrease in average weekly wages with a loss of 21.3 percent. Within Olmsted, a total wage decline of $287.3 million (-29.1 percent) in the education and health services industry had the largest impact on the county’s decrease in average weekly wages.

Tulsa, Okla., experienced the largest increase in average weekly wages with a gain of 8.6 percent over the year. County employment and wage data are compiled under the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program.

Large County Employment

In December 2011, national employment, as measured by the QCEW program, was 131.3 million, up by 1.4 percent or 1.8 million jobs, from December 2010. The 322 U.S. counties with 75,000 or more jobs accounted for 70.7 percent of total U.S. employment and 76.4 percent of total wages. These 322 counties had a net job growth of 1.2 million over the year, accounting for 68.8 percent of the overall U.S. employment increase.

Kern, Calif., had the largest percentage increase in employment among the largest U.S. counties (5.3 percent). The five counties with the largest increases in employment level were Harris, Texas; New York, N.Y.; Maricopa, Ariz.; Dallas, Texas; and Cook, Ill. These counties had a combined over-the-year gain of 219,500, or 12.3 percent of the overall employment increase for the U.S.

Employment declined in 46 of the large counties from December 2010 to December 2011. Benton, Wash., had the largest over-the-year percentage decrease in employment (-3.4 percent). Within Benton, professional and business services was the largest contributor to the decrease in employment with a loss of 2,280 jobs (-9.5 percent). St. Clair, Ill., had the second largest employment decrease, followed by Jackson, Ore.; Frederick, Md.; and Monmouth, N.J.

Large County Average Weekly Wages

Average weekly wages for the nation decreased by 1.7 percent during the year ending in the fourth quarter of 2011. Among the 322 largest counties, 282 had over-the-year declines in average weekly wages.

Olmsted, Minn., had the largest wage loss among the largest U.S. counties (-21.3 percent). This decline reflects a return to normal pay in 2011 following a big payout in education and health services in the fourth quarter of 2010.

Of the 322 largest counties, 36 experienced over-the-year increases in average weekly wages. Tulsa, Okla., had the largest average weekly wage increase with a gain of 8.6 percent. An acquisition within professional and business services resulted in large payouts in the fourth quarter of 2011, which significantly boosted the county’s average weekly wage. Total wages in this industry in Tulsa increased by $219.4 million (33.3 percent) over the year. Harford, Md., had the second largest increase in average weekly wages, followed by Lake, Ohio; Snohomish, Wash.; and Westmoreland, Pa.

Ten Largest U.S. Counties

All of the 10 largest counties experienced over-the-year percentage increases in employment in December 2011. Harris, Texas, experienced the largest gain in employment (3.1 percent). Within Harris, professional and business services had the largest over-the-year level increase among all private industry groups with a gain of 16,195 jobs (5.0 percent). Orange, Calif., had the smallest percent increase in employment among the 10 largest counties.

Eight of the 10 largest U.S. counties had an over-the-year decrease in average weekly wages. San Diego, Calif., experienced the largest decrease in average weekly wages with a loss of 3.6 percent, largely due to significant total wage declines over the year in financial activities (-$226.6 million or -17.3 percent). King, Wash., had the largest average weekly wage increase.

Data for the fourth quarter of 2011 will be available later at http://www.bls.gov/cew/. Additional information about the QCEW data may be obtained by calling (202) 691-6567.

Publicidad

Ir a Descanso PROMOCASA
Current edition
Ir a las noticias